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Monday, 22 September 2014

RECORDS


A Selection of recordings by Webster Booth. Most of these recordings may be heard on YouTube.




















Friday, 15 August 2014

WEBSTER BOOTH - TIMELINE (1950 TO 1956)

27 March 1950. Jubilee performance of Hiawatha. Webster Booth, Harold Williams and Isobel Baillie were the soloists.

Harold Williams sings My Grandfather's Clock














Arnold Greir plays The Prize Song 

 

28 May - 2 June 1951 Six Festival of Britain Concerts
Webster Booth sang in these concerts held at Davis Theatre, Croydon.

11 July 1951, Leeds Town Hall
He Was Despised - Marjorie Thomas











20 October 1951. Elijah at Royal Albert Hall, with Dorothy Bond, Mary Jarred, Webster Booth and Owen Brannigan. Organist: Arnold Greir. Orchestra conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent. 

Marked by Webster Booth on the cover of his Elijah score:






Mary Jarred sings The Lord's Prayer

















18 February 1953, Royal Albert Hall. Ash Wednesday

 Gladys Ripley sings Where Corals Lie (Elgar)


1 December 1953, Town Hall, Huddersfield












9 January 1954


















Webster Booth sings Heavenly Aida






7 April 1955 - Stainer's Crucifixion. 
Webster Booth and the up-and-coming baritone
 John Heddle Nash are  artists in the Good Friday performance of
Stainer's Crucifixion at All Souls', Langham Place with
choirs from Brighton, Reading, Colchester and Wisbech,
together with the BBC Chorus conducted by Leslie Woodgate,
and with Dr Thalben Ball at the organ. 

All Souls, Langham Place

O Mistress Mine - John Heddle Nash




 

This concert on 29 April 1955  was to celebrate Sir Malcolm's 60th birthday. He chose the soloists personally.







13 August 1955
Henry Wood Promenade Concerts - 61st season
ROYAL ALBERT HALL
Tonight at 7.30.
Soloists: Webster Booth
Hiawatha's Wedding Feast (Coleridge Taylor)
Song Cycle: To Julia (Quilter - arranged Sargent)
Peter Katin (Piano)
BBC Choral Society (Chorus master: Leslie Woodgate)
Royal Choral Society,
BBC Symphony Orchestra (Leader: Paul Beard)
Conductor: Sir Malcolm Sargent.


25 October 1955

Town Hall, Dewsbury.  
Judas Maccabaeus (Handel), 
Dewsbury and District Music Society
Honor Sheppard, Peggy Castle, Webster Booth and Owen Brannigan, 
Lemare Orchestra, conducted by Dr Percy G. Saunders.
Webster Booth:
Honor Sheppard:
Owen Brannigan:
http://youtu.be/ktt1B9YIEv8

After a concert tour of the Cape Province, Webster Booth returned to the UK to fulfil a Messiah engagement with the Huddersfield Choral Society in December 1955. The Booths left the UK to settle in South Africa on board the Pretoria Castle in July 1956. 


Jean Collen
©

Monday, 4 August 2014

GARDA HALL - SOUTH AFRICAN SOPRANO (1900 - 1968)




                                                    GARDA HALL (1900 - 1968)

Today South African soprano, Garda Hall, is hardly remembered in South Africa where she was born, or in the United Kingdom where she lived for most of her life and had a distinguished career as a singer. The only reason why I know anything about Garda Hall at all is that Webster Booth mentioned that he had sung and recorded with her on several occasions.  Her descendant, Quentin Hall, who lives in Western Australia, has shared some of his extensive family research with me so I thought I would write a short article about his distinguished ancestor.

Garda Hall was born in Durban, Natal in 1900 in the middle of the South African War. Garda was given the unusual middle name of Colenso, presumably in commemoration of the Battle of Colenso in 1899. Her parents were George Ernest Hall (1869 – 1933), originally from Torquay, Devon, and Maude Kate Amy Breeds (1878 – September 1959). Quentin presumes that George and Maude married in South Africa rather than the UK and the Breeds surname suggests to me that Garda’s mother was a South African of Dutch origin, rather than British.
 
Garda moved from Durban to Pietermaritzburg when she was seven years of age and attended the private Girls’ Collegiate School there. Her father owned a bicycle shop in Pietermaritzburg called Hall’s –The Cycle Specialists and sold it to renowned cyclist, Walter Jowett when the family settled in England. The cycling business remained Hall’s - The Cyclist Specialists until 1952 when Walter eventually changed the name of the business to Jowett Brothers.



Garda was not noted for her musical prowess at school. Apparently the music teacher told her that she was singing out of tune and asked her to leave the music class! It should be pointed out that some children who sing out of tune begin to sing in tune as they mature. Despite being good enough to be accepted at the Royal Academy of Music in 1920 and doing well there, several critics remarked on occasional lapses of intonation when she became a professional singer.


In 1920, she boarded the Norman Castle in Durban with her mother, who was 41 at the time. 


They arrived in Southampton on 9 August 1920 and Garda began her vocal studies at the Royal Academy of Music in London at the beginning of the new term in September, taking lessons with the renowned singing teacher, Frederick King who trained many notable singers including Norman Allin, Miriam Licette, Carmen Hill and Robert Radford. T. Arnold Fulton, the Scottish organist and choral director of the London Select Choir and the choir at St Columba’s Church in London where he was organist and choir master, acted as studio accompanist to Frederic King at the Royal Academy. Some years later Arnold Fulton moved to South Africa and taught singing based on the methods he had learnt from Frederic King.


Garda obtained the diplomas of ARAM and LRAM. Interestingly, she apparently trained as a mezzo soprano at the Academy, yet sang as a lyric soprano during her subsequent career as a singer. She was awarded the Gilbert Betjemann Gold Medal at the Academy for operatic singing in 1923. 




Not long after she graduated, she sang at the first Grand Ballad Concert of the season at the Guildhall, Plymouth on 29 September 1923, and in 1925 she made a triumphant return to Pietermaritzburg and Durban and gave several successful recitals while she was there. The closing item which she sang at the Pietermaritzburg concert was Poor Wand’ring One from The Pirates of PenzanceI wonder what her disapproving music mistress at ;the Collegiate School thought about this! If she had left South Africa as a second-rate, sometimes out of tune mezzo, she had returned to the country of her birth as an engaging lyric soprano. At the time of her trip her parents were living in Winkelspruit on the South Coast of Natal, but by 1930 the whole family moved to 137 King Henry’s Road, South Hampstead, the address where Garda remained until her death in 1968.
Towards the end of that year Garda sang in Burnley in aid of the Police Convalescent fund. Two of her fellow artistes were distinguished singers of the day - Muriel Brunskill (contralto) and Tudor Davies (tenor). At a concert the following year, the critic remarked on her clean-cut articulation (in English and French) and her ability to sing a comfortable high E. However, he disapproved of “an almost continuous vibrato which adversely affected her intonation”. He suggested that she should work on her breathing to correct this fault – shades of that music mistress in Pietermaritzburg!
1926 was an auspicious year for Garda as she began recording for His Master’s Voice (HMV). One of her notable recordings was the Mozart Requiem with  the Philharmonic Choir and orchestra, conducted by Charles Kennedy Scott on 6 July at the Queen’s Hall.Other singers on the recording were Nellie Walker, Sydney Coltham and Edward Halland.She was also bridesmaid at the wedding of baritone Roy Henderson and Bertha Smyth in March. The couple had met when studying at the Royal Academy, presumably at the same time as Garda herself. Garda often appeared in concerts with Roy Henderson in the twenties and thirties. Roy Henderson began teaching singing in 1940 and is renowned as the teacher of Kathleen Ferrier.


Baritone Roy Henderson (1899 - 2000)


Here is a link to Roy Henderson singing Sylvia by Oley Speaks.
http://youtu.be/PKwpcTvMO6U
 

During the twenties, Garda was making a name for herself as a popular concert singer, recording artiste and broadcaster, although critics were still concerned about her violent vibrato and doubtful intonation as opposed to her vocal good points of agility and wide range. She was singing with the finest singers of the day, as can be seen in this article of 1928:




On 6 March 1930 Webster Booth was establishing himself on record, radio, as the Duke of Buckingham in the West End production of The Three Musketeers, and as a tenor soloist in oratorio, but he was still entertaining at dinners and benefit concerts, such as one at the Finsbury Town Hall for the Clerkenwell Benevolent Society, where South African soprano, Garda Hall was one of the other entertainers. Charles Forwood, who was to become the permanent accompanist of Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth when they went on the variety stage in 1940, accompanied at this concert.

Charles Forwood is seated at the piano, accompanying Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler in the 1940s.

A newspaper cutting on 20 March 1930 reads as follows: The Clerkenwell Benevolent Society benefited to a considerable extent as a result of a concert at the Finsbury Town Hall on March 6. There was a generous provision of talent, among those to please a large and enthusiastic audience being Garda Hall, Doris Smerdon, Gladys Limage, Doris Godfrey, Hilda Gladney Woolf, Maidie Hebditch, Webster Booth, Ashmoor Burch, Charles Hayes, Fred Wildon and Lloyd Shakespeare, with Charles Forwood as accompanist. It is interesting that some of these names are still remembered today, while others are completely unknown.
                                                          Old Finsbury Town Hall.
Later  in that year, Garda returned to South Africa and her parents came to England on board the Gloucester Castle to make their home with her. For a short time they lived at 142 King Henry’s Drive, Hampstead, but later moved to 137 King Henry’s Drive, where she remained until her death in 1968.

In March 1932 Garda took part in a broadcast of popular opera with another South African singer who had made a career in the UK, the contralto Betsy de la Porte. In the same year she sang in a concert devoted to Viennese music at the Pump Room in Bath. The conductor was Edward Dunn, and baritone George Baker, Webster’s great friend and mentor, was the other soloist. Several years later, Garda suggested to Edward Dunn that he should apply for the position of musical director of Durban Opera. He was chosen from 200 candidates and remained in South Africa for the rest of his life. The last I heard of him was when he was conducting the Johannesburg Philharmonic Society and giving lectures on musical appreciation in the sixties.
In May 1932 Garda made a 12 inch recording of Musical Comedy Gems (1) and Musical Comedy Gems (2) with George Baker (C2412) of songs from The Chocolate Soldier, The Desert Song, Rose Marie and The Merry Widow.

                                                George Baker and Garda Hall
On 22 May 1933, Frederic King, Garda’s singing teacher at the academy, died at the age of 80, and on 1 October of the same year, .Webster was on the same bill as Garda Hall at the Palladium. Other performers on that bill were Debroy Somers and his band, Leonard Henry (compère), Raie da Costa (the brilliant South African pianist who died at an early age) and Stainless Stephen. Webster had also been booked to sing at the National Sunday League concerts at the Finsbury Park Empire, and the same artistes as those at the Palladium were due to perform at the Lewisham Town Hall later in October.

 Raie da Costa


A link to Raie da Costa on YouTube: 
Raie da Costa, South African pianist
On 15 March 1934 Garda Hall sang in Torquay with the Municipal Orchestra there and the short newspaper article announcing the date pointed out that her father had been a Torquay man. She sang an aria from Die Fledermaus at the Queen’s Hall on the last night of the Promenade concerts on 6 October 1934, conducted by Sir Henry Wood.
On 5 December 1935, Garda Hall, Webster and George Baker sang in a concert version of Gounod’s Faust and the Beggar’s Opera at the Playhouse, Galashiels on the Scottish Borders. The Galashiels Choral Society (concert master: Robert Barrow) and orchestra were conducted by Herbert More.
The following year Webster sang with Garda again on 16 September at a Shrewsbury Carnival Concert. Other performers were Ronald Gourley (entertainer) and the Alfredo Campoli Trio

Alfredo Campoli


In the above link, the trio plays Gypsy Moon.

Child singer Ann Stephens with whistling by Ronald Gourley

.
I have been reading B.C. Hilliam's autobiography Flotsam's Follies (Flotsam of Flotsam and Jetsam) and discovered that Garda Hall sang in his song cycle, Autumn's Orchestra. It was performed at the Queen's Hall, with Garda Hall, Gladys Ripley, Heddle Nash, and Malcolm McEachern as vocalists and Albert Sandler as violinist.

Flotsam and Jetsam
In May 1937 Theatreland at Coronation Time was released featuring Stuart Robertson, Garda Hall, Webster Booth and Sam Costa. The critic in Gramophone remarked, “Mr Booth sings gloriously, Mr Robertson defiantly, Miss Hall charmingly, while Mr Costa contributes a fleeting reminiscence of a more sophisticated and yet oh so simple entertainment.” The 12”78rpm, HMV C2903 cost 4/-.

 There is an entry for Garda Hall in Who's Who in Music (1937): Hall, Garda ARAM, LRAM. Born Durban, educated at Royal Academy of Music. Betjemann Gold Medalist. Singing, Chamber music, oratorio, operatic. Recreation: gardening. Address: 137 King Henry's Road NW3. Telephone: Primrose 4436

Garda continued singing during the war, often at CEMA concerts and in oratorio. She sang Messiah at the Albert Hall, Nottingham in December 1940.

27 March 1942
 22 January 1943



The final cutting about Garda Hall appeared on 5 January 1945.



I could find nothing more about her, apart from her entry in the Musicians Who’s Who in 1949, which was much the same as the 1937 entry. In 1945 she was 45 years of age so I cannot believe that she retired from singing at such an early age. Perhaps she taught singing after she retired from the concert platform, although there is no proof of this.  Her mother died in the late 1950s and she herself died on 7 June 1968. She did not marry. If anyone has further information about Garda Hall, I would be very glad to hear from you. 
British Newspaper archive 
B.C. Hilliam Flotsam's Follies, p. 123
Quentin Hall of Western Australia for genealogical research on his relative, Garda Hall

Jean Collen

©

4 August 2014